Re-Blog: Normandy Invasion— A Day to Remember

Rich Weatherly:

Re-Blog of a tribute to those whose heroism and sacrifices lead the way to the defeat of Nazi Germany and helped us ensure freedom in the western hemisphere.
It’s been said, “Freedom isn’t free.” The Normandy Invasion, commonly called D-Day, signaled the beginning of the end of Nazi tyranny and lead to victory in Europe. Of those who fought there, few remain to tell their stories. It is fitting that we continue to honor their sacrifices and heroism.

 

Originally posted on Rich Weatherly - Author:

June 6, 1944

A LCVP (Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel) fro...

A LCVP (Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel) from the U.S. Coast Guard-manned USS Samuel Chase disembarked troops of the U.S. Army’s First Division on the morning of June 6, 1944 (D-Day) at Omaha Beach. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It’s been said, “Freedom isn’t free.” The Normandy Invasion, commonly called DDay, signaled the beginning

Landing craft and tanks at Omaha beach during ...

of the end of Nazi tyranny and freedom in Europe. Of those who fought there, few remain to tell their stories. It is fitting that we continue to honor their sacrifices and heroism.

Allied forces consisting of American, British and Canadian troops made up the main invasion force of over 160,000 ground combatants. Allied Navy and merchants ships numbered more than 5,000. Ships provided transportation and gunfire support during the invasion. At midnight before the amphibious assault, Allied Aircraft and gliders inserted almost 8,000 paratroopers behind enemy lines. This represented the largest armada and invasion…

View original 378 more words

5 Comments

Filed under Historical WWII, Liberation of Europe, Normandy Invasion, Word War 2

5 responses to “Re-Blog: Normandy Invasion— A Day to Remember

  1. My Uncle Carl piloted one those landing crafts! Ah, the memories of a child!

    • Thank you Billy Ray and your uncle for his service.
      My ship patrolled the northern Mariana Islands and islands to the north. I noticed our executive officer with a tear in his eye as we passed close offshore of Iwo Jima. Later I learned he piloted a landing craft there. They truly were the Greatest Generation.

    • Thank you for sharing, Billy Ray. I though I’d responded to your comment already. Those men set a standard for bravery that warriors continue to look up to. The executive officer of my ship, piloted landing craft at Iwo Jima and was strongly affected by that experience when our ship cruised offshore of the island during one of our patrols.

  2. I have no words. We owe such a debt of thanks to those warriors.

    • Thank you, Sarah.
      We should never forget their sacrifices. They faced the most horrifying obstacles imaginable, defeated fascism and restored freedom in western Europe.
      God bless them and their service!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s